Number 19 – “Godzilla vs. Gigan” (1972)

 

 

As I said in my “Godzilla vs. Megalon” review, “Godzilla vs. Gigan” and that movie are so intertwined that it is almost impossible for me to separate them. Mostly because both of these movies are products of their time. In the 1970s, the daikaiju boom of the 1960s had lost its luster and monster movies in Japan were seen more as children’s films than ones for adults. This certainly was not helped by Daiei making cheesy and campy Gamera movies that were always aimed at little kids, and the Godzilla movies started doing more comedic scenes with implausible plots, even for monster movies.

Both “Godzilla vs. Megalon” and “Godzilla vs. Gigan” are the height of that campy, cheesy era, while also keeping their budgets low and relying probably far too much on stock footage. So not only were these movies made for kids, but they were often lazy too.

The reason I put “Godzilla vs. Gigan” ahead of “Megalon” is because it feels like there was more effort put into the movie. Not much more effort, but enough to notice that there are some good monster scenes to be found here, even if you have to wait some time to get to them. In a way, “Gigan” feels like more of what we got in the 1960s with Godzilla, with its sense of atmosphere, monster battles and music, while still going heavy on the 1970s acid and counter culture antics.

 

 

Our movie begins with a comic book writer, Gengo Kotaka (Hiroshi Ishikawa), trying to sell his ideas for monsters to his publisher, in particular monsters centered around homework and strict mothers. His publisher thinks his ideas are terrible, even though they are what he asked for when he wanted something far away from the kaiju on Monster Island. Gengo starts looking for inspiration and goes to a newly built area of Japan known as World Children’s Land, with it’s main attraction being a Godzilla tower that is just as tall as the real Godzilla.

While Gento is there, he bumps into a young lady who drops a weird tape. He quickly finds out this girl is being chased by the head of security Kubota (Toshiaka Nishizawa), who says that Gento shouldn’t worry about what she was up to. Gento secretly holds onto the tape as he meets with the chairman of the World Children’s Land, Fumio Sudo (Zan Fujita), a young prodigy who is far too busy with astrological calculations to pay much attention to Gento, outside of saying he wants to bring about peace to the entire world.

Eventually, we find out exactly what the chairman means by “peace,” and that is the age-old villain perspective of bringing about peace by wiping out all of humanity. In this case, the chairman needs that tape to broadcast a signal into outer space that would put the monsters Gigan and King Ghidorah under his control. He would then use his two monsters to destroy all human life and anything that stands in his way. Oh, and it turns out the chairman and Kubota are aliens from the Space Hunter Nebula M galaxy – giant cockroaches disguised as humans.

We’ll ignore the obvious logical hole of a tapes’ signal reaching beyond the vacuum of space and simply ask why these aliens went to all the trouble of building a land for children and proclaiming peace when all they ever wanted was to wipe us out. Wouldn’t it just be easier to take the tapes, summon King Ghidorah and Gigan and conquer the world? Why even give humans a chance to learn about your plans and stop you?

These aliens have the same problem as the Futurians in “Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah” – they give our heroes an unreasonable number of opportunities to foil their plans.

Gento eventually meets up with the girl who got her hands on the tape and her hippie boyfriend who threatens Gento with an ear of corn (though Gento believes it is a gun). They play one tape and it has a strange effect on the kaiju on Monster Island – they start talking. Yup, in the English version of this movie, we get to hear Godzilla and Anguirus have a full conversation about how something funny is going on. Personally, I would have liked to see them do an entire Quentin Tarantino-like exchange, maybe the opening scene from “Inglorious Basterds,” but this is still just as hilarious.

 

 

In the Japanese version, Godzilla, and Anguirus have this conversation through word balloons, like a comic book, and it is just as silly. They only have two conversations in the movie, one about how Anguirus needs to go check out what’s going on, and another about how Anguirus needs to keep up if they want to save Tokyo from Gigan and King Ghidorah.

Gigan’s design is one of the more unique kaiju out there. A chicken-looking monster with hooks for hands, one giant red eye shaped like a Cylon visor from “Battlestar Galatica,” with a buzz saw on his chest and huge oddly-shaped fins on his back. His design is certainly the most memorable thing about his character, because otherwise he comes across like a dummy who has no idea how his body even works.

Once Gigan and King Ghidorah are introduced, they spend about twenty minutes destroying Tokyo together until Godzilla and Anguirus show up to engage in the titular monster battle. Most of the destruction scenes with these two monsters are comprised of stock footage from previous Godzilla movies, especially the shots with King Ghidorah, though it is set to Akira Ifukube’s amazing music.

In fact, that’s another thing I should address – this film is not only made up of mostly stock footage, but also all stock music. Just about every piece of music used in “Godzilla vs. Gigan” was composed by Akira Ifukube, but was taken from about ten or twelve different movies that he worked on in the past. Honestly, I don’t mind this as much as the stock footage, because Ifukube’s music is used well here, adding more impact to many of the monster scenes that it would otherwise lack.

I like to think of “Godzilla vs. Gigan” as a best-of compilation for Akira Ifukube’s music.

 

 

Anyway, after another long swim, Godzilla and Anguirus arrive in the middle of Gigan and King Ghidorah’s attack on Tokyo, leading us into a battle that takes up the entire third act of the movie, like “Megalon” and “Godzilla vs. Space Godzilla.” But unlike those two films, “Gigan” has these four monsters battling all over the place, starting in the oil refinery district of Tokyo, before moving to a large grassy plain, and then to the World Children’s Land, where the Godzilla Tower gets in on the action and starts shooting the real Godzilla with its beam.

One aspect I’ll give this film credit for is making it look like Godzilla’s having the toughest battle of his life (up to this point), as he gets smothered by King Ghidorah, blasted by Godzilla tower, is practically blind at one point in the fight, and Gigan becomes the first monster in the Showa series to make Godzilla bleed. This was not an easy fight for Godzilla and Anguirus, and it is only due to the interference of our main characters that Godzilla is victorious.

Gento and his friends are able to infiltrate the Godzilla tower at one point and plant explosives in the elevator, causing the head to blow up and destroying the tapes that controlled Gigan and King Ghidorah. With the two being practically incapacitated, Godzilla and Anguirus take advantage of this and do some gravity defying stunts, as Godzilla tosses King Ghidorah around like a rag-doll and Anguirus slams into both monsters with his spikey back with the thrust power of a rocket.

 

 

If there’s one part of this fight that I’m not a fan of it, it is the suits they choose for King Ghidorah and Godzilla. This Ghidorah, while not too different from the one that was around in the 1960s, looks much skinnier and doesn’t have as much detail on the heads and eyes, making it look like this Ghidorah went on a diet. While this Godzilla suit had been previously used in the last three Godzilla movies, the wear-and-tear on the suit is clearly visible. Near the end of the movie, you can practically see the suit falling apart. The bad monster suits bring me out of the fight nowadays, especially as the fight goes on and it relies less on stock footage and more on the crappy cheap suits.

I would normally say the fight between the four monsters was the best part of the movie, but honestly the human characters are so energized and quirky that I liked most of their scenes better than many of the monster fights. Gento’s girlfriend was especially great, since she constantly used her martial arts skills to fight off the cockroaches henchmen and wasn’t afraid to call Gento out every once in a while. It felt like they played an active role in this attempt to save the planet, maybe even more so than Godzilla.

Still, “Godzilla vs. Gigan” is not well-put together. It is cheap, from its monster suits to its use of stock footage, convoluted, and more than a little silly. But it never takes itself too seriously and always has an upbeat attitude thanks to its main cast of characters. The soundtrack all of Akira Ifukube’s greatest hits and is used wonderfully in this movie. I’m not entirely sure if I’d call this one “so bad, it’s good,” but it does blur the line between the two.

 

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Number 20 – “Godzilla vs. Megalon” (1973)

 

 

These next two Godzilla films have way more in common for me than they probably do for most people. Not only were numbers 20 and 19 made less than a year apart, they have the same director, both involve aliens using monsters to take over the world while Godzilla comes in to stop them, they were made on the cheap, and are the only two Godzilla films that fall into the “so bad, it’s good” category. To me, “Godzilla vs. Megalon” and the next entry in our countdown, “Godzilla vs. Gigan” are inseparable.

“Godzilla vs. Megalon” is one of the last entries in the first series of Godzilla films, known as the Showa series. At this point in the series, these films were no longer aimed at the general film-going audience, but little kids who were more used to Saturday morning cartoons about super heroes fighting off bad guys. And this film fully embraces that attitude with its pleasant exterior, convoluted yet silly plot, and the way Godzilla is framed as a super hero instead of world destroying menace.

This film was made on an extremely tight budget, far smaller than most other Godzilla films, and was reportedly filmed over the course of three weeks. In fact, originally this wasn’t even supposed to be a Godzilla movie, but was going to be a solo film about Godzilla’s side kick, Jet Jaguar, but Toho thought that kids wouldn’t be sold on just Jet Jaguar, so they included Godzilla at the last minute.

Interestingly enough, the design of Jet Jaguar was supposedly created by some kid in elementary school. Toho let kids submitted their entry for Jet Jaguar’s design, and this is the look they choose – A robot that looks like Jack Nicholson wearing sun glasses and a Mister Rogers sweater. Oh, and Jet Jaguar can change sizes, between being human-sized and giant monster-sized…and yet, Jet Jaguar supposedly programmed himself to do that, even though he’s only equipped to do remedial work, so how he’s able to change size on a whim is anyone’s guess.

Are you starting to see why this falls into the “so bad, it’s good” category?

 

 

The plot of the film begins with a real world issue at the time – underground nuclear testing. It turns out these tests had disturbed an ancient race of people that had been living underground for millions of years in the city known as Seatopia. These nuclear tests have destroyed more than a third of their country, and now they wish to retaliate against the surface dwellers by unleashing their giant monster to give us a good butt-whooping. Their monster is the cockroach monster that has Christmas-tree drills for hands and can spew napalm, Megalon.

Their way of unleashing Megalon is through interpretive dance and a stern talking to from the Seatopian leader. They also didn’t seem to have a solid plan once Megalon reached the surface, outside of cause a general panic and a little destruction.

So a film that was motivated by the horrors of underground nuclear tests has quickly devolved into the ancient ancestors of Easter Island unleashing a bug monster that can’t be tamed without the help of a Jack Nicholson-looking robot and will cause some mild inconvenience in Tokyo. I would say this is the dumbest plot of any Godzilla movie if it wasn’t so hilariously bad that I actually have fun with it.

The first half of the film is spent with the inventor of Jet Jaguar, Goro Ibuki (Katsuhiko Sasaki), his kid brother Rokuro (Hiroyuki Kawase) and Goro’s best friend Hiroshi Jinkawa (Yutaka Hayashi), as Seatopian agents hunt the three of them down to gain access to Goro’s lab and get control over Jet Jaguar, which the Seatopians plan to use as bait for Megalon. Goro claims to have created Jet Jaguar, but doesn’t seem to understand how he works, acting genuinely surprised when he grows, knows how to fight giant monsters, and doesn’t listen to his commands. Rokuro is your typical kid character with an annoyingly high-pitched voice and upsettingly short shorts for a little boy, something you’d see often in the Gamera films at this same time. The friend Hiroshi, on the other hand, is the true badass of the film, always engaging the Seatopians in a fight and often pursuing them in car chases, leading to an excellently hilarious chase scene down the side of a mountain and a large flight of stairs.

 

 

Eventually, Goro and his gang are able to get Jet Jaguar away from the control of the Seatopians and tell him to go to Monster Island and bring Godzilla back to fight Megalon. Upon hearing that Jet Jaguar is getting Godzilla, the Seatopian controller decides to call up the leaders of the Space Hunter M galaxy (I guess he has them on speed dial) so they can lend him Gigan to fight Godzilla.

I’ll give my thoughts on Gigan next time, but let’s just say that he and Megalon are two peas in a pod – outrageous designs that scream of the 1970s, but are ultimately both as dumb as a bag of giant hammers. They work fairly well off of each other, as far as evil mutant monsters go, and it makes for a fairly entertaining fight between the two of them and Jet Jaguar.

Of course, Godzilla eventually shows up (though he takes his sweet ass time to swim from Monster Island to Japan), and we have ourselves a two-on-two monster battle. But Godzilla’s fighting style is a little different from the previous movies. Instead of mostly using his strength, claws and atomic breath, Godzilla uses…kung-fu fighting and props.

If you were ever wondering what it would be like if Bruce Lee was underneath the Godzilla suit, here is your answer.

 

 

Honestly, the fight between these four monsters is pretty entertaining, in much the same way the final battle in “Godzilla vs. Space Godzilla” is fun to watch – it takes up the entire last third of the movie and leads to a few clever scenarios. My favorite part is when Gigan and Megalon trap Godzilla and Jet Jaguar in a ring of napalm fire, something Godzilla would normally be able to walk through no problem, but instead Godzilla just rides Jet Jaguar out of the fire and finally uses his atomic breath on the two villain monsters. It is exactly what I would expect from an over-the-top and silly monster movie.

I should also note that about a third of the monster scenes in “Godzilla vs. Megalon” are all stock footage from previous Godzilla and Toho monster movies. That makes sense, considering this film had to be made in three weeks and I don’t mind it nearly as much here as I did in “Godzilla’s Revenge.” The stock footage isn’t incorporated very well though, since one scene has Megalon attacking some jets, but the stock footage shows Gigan’s hook hands destroying the planes.

But in the end, I have a ton of fun with “Godzilla vs. Megalon.” It is by no means a good movie, and might be one of the worst put-together Godzilla films. But it never takes itself seriously in the slightest and offers a lot of stupid, over-the-top, cheesy moments that I can’t help but crack a smile at, especially Godzilla’s now-infamous tail slide.

However, if you’re going to watch “Godzilla vs. Megalon,” there is absolutely a definitive version that makes the viewing experience even better – the “Mystery Science Theater 3000” version of this movie. MST3K riffed on two Godzilla movies, and this one absolutely deserved it, but their jokes only enhance the already ludicrous plot and monsters. As far as I know, there are no cut scenes in the MST3K version, so you get to see the full movie, plus some of the best casual riffing Joel and the bots did in the early seasons of the show.

 

 

Overall, this is my go-to definition of the “so bad, it’s good” movie. All other films that are hilariously awful are compared to “Godzilla vs. Megalon” for me. This movie is barely held together by scotch tape and bubble gum, has the strangest and most outlandish plot of any Godzilla movie, is centered around a dopey-looking robot that can’t even be understood by his creator, and features a monster that knows kung fu. How can you not at least enjoy the absurd nature of this crappy movie?

 

Movie Review – “Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid” (1973)

 

 

Part of the reason I enjoy the Western genre so much is because of how free it makes me feel. Like I’m the one who is out exploring wild uncharted territory. The old west is whatever you want to make of it, so when we get see men who take advantage of that by manipulating the setting to their own benefit that is when it feels like the Western is at its best.

“Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid” exemplifies that more than most other Westerns and does that spectacularly through the way its two lead characters use the wild west as their own personal playground. Pat Garrett (James Coburn) is a famous outlaw who has seen that, as he gets older, the world around him seems to be changing. So he decides to quit being a criminal and becomes a sheriff, using his first bit of legal power to hunt down his old friend Billy the Kid (Kris Kristofferson). Billy won’t go down without a fight though, and the two spend most of the movie chasing each other, while Pat comes to terms with his new morality and world view, and Billy drinks, shoots, and screws his way through New Mexico with a huge smile.

The film was directed by Sam Peckinpah, who was known for his over-the-top violence in films like “The Wild Bunch.” While this movie has a violent moment here or there, it does take its time to build the rambunctious yet nostalgic world of the old west. It paints the actions of the characters with a longingness for a simpler time and how beautiful it must have felt to own the world if you were good enough with a gun. Pat Garrett longs to be apart of that world again, but knows that it will be ending soon and so he has to change if he’s going to fit in it. Billy still lives in that world and will fight for it to his dying breath.

The film is perfectly summed up near the beginning when Billy asks Pat how it feels to be a man of the law now. Pat responds with, “It feels like times have changed.” Billy follows this up with a big drink of whiskey and says, “Times maybe. But not me.”

 

 

These two don’t share much screentime together, but from that exchange you get how they have built an undying friendship while also establishing an ideological conflict between the two that must come to clash.

From what I understand, the film isn’t accurate on how Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid actually acted, and that might make some people angry, but I see the film as more of an appreciation and love for the old west and the type of lives these men chose to lead. Sam Peckinpah loves the myths these men created and wants to make them legends from a bygone era.

Overall, I adore “Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.” It is fun, emotional, beautifully-shot and has the best sense of longing for the west than any other Western I have seen. The film takes a simple like cowboys vs. outlaws and turns it on its head, creating a conflict that never gets tiresome, especially when you have two charismatic no-nonsense actors playing your leads.

Final Grade: A-

 

Movie Review – “The Omen” (1976)

 

 

Imagine a sequel to “Rosemary’s Baby” if they decided to ramp up the violence and the idea of demons and satanic cults, and you would probably get something like “The Omen.”

While “Rosemary’s Baby” was more-so about the mystery of what was happening around Rosemary and the fate of her baby, “The Omen” is all-in on the fear and making you genuinely afraid that the Antichrist is coming and that the end of the world is upon us.

On the night that the son of American diplomat Robert Thorn (Gregory Peck) is born, Thorn is told the baby died moments after the birth. With his wife Katherine (Lee Remick) unaware that their child was stillborn, Robert is convinced by a priest to adopt another new born child whose mother died during birth. The two raise their adopted son, Damien, in the United Kingdom, though Robert never tells Katherine that Damien is adopted.

But on Damien’s fifth birthday, things take a turn for the hellish when his babysitter throws herself off their mansion’s balcony. After this, Robert is visited by an Italian priest, Father Brennan (Patrick Troughton), who warns Robert that Damien must die in order to save him, his wife and the world from the Antichrist.

 

 

What sold me on the terror of this situation was the prophecy of the Antichrist, in particular how he would take over the world, and how it matched up with the life Damien was leading. It was a simple yet effective technique, since a five-year old couldn’t show demonic powers and the apocalypse by himself.

There was also this constant ominous atmosphere to Robert’s search for the truth, like he was always being watched by this entity that could strike him down at any moment. By that entity holds back, letting Robert uncover so much before doing anything about it. Is it because of the importance Robert must play in Damien’s growth? Or maybe because this force just loves toying with people and showing their lack of control in the world? Either way, this force looms over the entire film like a stalker, waiting for just the right moment to sink his claws into his prey and getting the most enjoyment out of it.

Overall, “The Omen” feels like a middle ground between “Rosemary’s Baby” and “The Exorcist,” filled with mystery and intrigue, but also with the fear of a parent helpless to stop unspeakable horrors and monstrosities. With the satanic chorus, gothic architecture and ever-present demonic atmosphere, this does feel like one of the most evil movies I have ever watched.

Final Grade: A-

 

Movie Review – “Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance” (1974)

 

 

If you didn’t get enough blood, gore, and samurai dismemberment in the first “Lady Snowblood,” get ready for even more in the sequel, plus nudity, long take fight sequences and very 1970s style filmmaking with “Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance.”

Set after the events of the first film, Yuki (Meiko Kaji) has been sentenced to life in prison for the crimes she committed. But when the secret police learn of her talents, they reach out to and give her an ultimatum – Spend the rest of her life in prison, or work for them and have her sentenced reduced.

 

 

What stood out to me in this film, outside of the up’ed level of violence from the first film, was the cinematography and the style in which of the flashbacks are shown. There are lots of great uses of color here, including some beautiful shots of the bright red sun setting on the ocean, or the dark blue colors of night. The flashbacks reminded me of “Under the Flag of the Rising Sun” in how stylized and unique they got, with strange camera angles, even weirder editing styles and lack of color.

“Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance” offers exactly what we got in the first film, with plenty of rage and violence to go around, but presents it in a far more captivating style. Now there’s far more that catches the eye outside of the bright red blood splatter.

Final Grade: B+

 

Movie Review – “Lady Snowblood” (1973)

Meet the biggest inspiration for the “Kill Bill” saga – “Lady Snowblood.” And it is exactly what it sounds like.

Set in feudal Japan, at a time when thieves and mobsters ruled peasants through fear of samurais and warlords, a group of four criminals attack and kill a peaceful teacher in brutal fashion, in front of his wife and son. They proceed to kill the son and rape the wife, Sayo. One of the criminals takes Sayo for himself, hiding her away to work for him, while Sayo eventually kills this man but is sentenced to life in prison.

Sayo then realizes there is only one thing she can do – birth another child, and have that child carry on her plans of revenge and murder the other three criminals responsible for all this. She does eventually bring another child into this hateful world, a girl Yuki (Meiko Kaji). She is taught in the ways of sword fighting by a priest, who believes Yuki is a demon of vengeance, meant to bring order to a chaotic time.

 

 

The violence in “Lady Snowblood” is the over-the-top insanity you would expect from a 1970s Japanese movie, with vibrant colorful blood, and characters dying into the most exaggerated ways, especially with Yuki’s main weapon being an umbrella with a dagger inside the handle. If that sounds like something you would enjoy, you will get a kick out of this movie.

This one is a nice change-of-pace for a Japanese samurai tale, since I don’t recall many female sword users in Japanese cinema. That is a trend that comes up in other cultures, especially nowadays, but to see this happen in 1970s Japan is special. It could be that “Lady Snowblood” is based off a manga, but the movie rarely shows it with how authentic it feels to the samurai experience.

Overall, I had a lot of fun with “Lady Snowblood.” It is grotesque, over-the-top, yet fateful to the samurai lifestyle to make its quieter moments hit harder. It is not hard to see how this film influenced Quentin Tarantino with its violent style that is wholly unique.

Final Grade: B+

 

Movie Review – “Sleeper” (1973)

 

 

I would have never expected to love a Woody Allen film as much as I enjoyed “Sleeper” but this film caught me completely off guard, while also teaching me that I love slapstick and visual comedy more than verbal comedy.

As I’ve mentioned, Woody Allen movies are so hit-and-miss with me, some leave a great impression on me like “Midnight in Paris” or “Crimes and Misdemeanors” while others like “Annie Hall” or “Hannah and Her Sisters” make me want to claw my eyes out. Part of me feels that Allen’s work gets better when he distances himself from the movie, by making his characters less like his neurotic, annoying self. But “Sleeper” throws a wrench into all of that by embarrassing the standard Woody Allen protagonist and changing the world around him.

Suddenly, I found this to be comedic genius.

Miles Monroe (Allen) was the owner of a health-food store in Greenwich village in the 1970s, but goes in for a surgery and ends up cryogenically frozen, only to be woken up 200 years later. Miles finds the world vastly different from the one he left, where countries no longer seem to exist, sex is only done inside of small booths called the “Orgasmo-tron,” polite robots perform all tedious tasks and the world is ruled by a man known as the great leader. Miles has been brought out of his sleep to infiltrate a top secret facility for the rebellion, a group intent on taking down the dictatorship.

 

 

Part of the reason this works is because it is a reverse fish-out-of-water story, where we are put in the same position as our protagonist. Not only is Allen an alien to this world, but so are we. Every new advancement in technology that we learn about is so wildly bizarre yet strangely alluring, like the previously mentioned sex machine or the way food is cooked. This makes Allen’s reactions to the new world so much more enjoyable when we are having a similar reaction.

I found myself laughing at nearly every scene, from Miles learning about this strange drug ball, to a chase around the robot repair facility that may or may not involve dismemberment, to Miles getting stuck in a suit that lets him bounce like he’s on the moon. So many memorable scenes, but my favorite was probably Miles learning how food is cooked in the future and he ends up creating a blob-like monster by mixing two similar viles together and has to fight it off with a broom.

While “Sleeper” wants to be a parody of dark tales of the future, like “1984” or “Fahrenheit 451,” it is also Allen’s tribute to the greats of slapstick comedy, like Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin and the Marx Brothers. This shows constantly throughout the movie, as there are many single shot sequences with little dialogue and lots of physical comedy. But fewer pies in the face, and more avoiding the dangers of the future by strange methods that would make Jackie Chan blush.

 

 

“Sleeper” does have its share of verbal comedy, especially when the people of the future want information on celebrities of the past and Allen tells the strangest lies about people like Richard Nixon and Joseph Stalin. But the focus of this film is on slapstick, which made realize just how much I adore visual comedy, at least in the movies. At its best, slapstick embraces the visual art form of film and can tell us so much without saying a word. It is enjoyable in the simplest of ways, but can be far more satisfying than the greatest of verbal sparrings.

“Sleeper” takes me back to movies like “Duck Soup” and “City Lights” and gives non-stop laughs, while also offering a future that uniquely dark yet strangely comforting, a world that has its dark side but does not seem all that bad. The film takes every opportunity to explore this laughable world while giving us a Woody Allen character that never gets too annoying. This was a joy to watch from start to finish and is now my favorite Woody Allen movie.

Final Grade: A+